Tuesday, February 16, 2010

Melting Pot Monday...errr...Tuesday


The New Brighton Archeological Society
by, Mark Andrew Smith
Young Adult Fantasy Graphic Novel
Image Comics (March 4, 2009)

Out of the ashes of misfortune will rise the next generation of great adventurers! After their parents are lost on an archeological expedition, four children begin to unlock the secrets of their parents' mysterious lives, discovering a hidden world of mystical artifacts, mythical creatures, and arcane knowledge. Soon they find themselves drawn into a conflict over a great library that has kept two kingdoms at war for centuries, the children must save an enchanted forest, the birthplace of magic itself. Join us as these children become the latest members of the fabled New Brighton Archeological Society, and take their first steps towards their true destiny!

This graphic novel can be purchased through Amazon.com.

*I was actually able to view several chapters of this graphic novel and I have to say I was pleasantly surprized.  Not only was it cute and colorful, it was funny.  I can see this having mass appeal for all ages.  This would make an excellent addition to a library collection.

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Complicit
by, Mark Gilbert
pub date: 2010-02-10

Everyone with skin in the money game had a vested interest in pretending that nothing could go awry.

The credit crunch is affecting every investor and every consumer, every industry and every government program, yet few people truly understand how it happened. Subprime mortgages have been center stage, but behind the scenes a conspiracy of greed among bankers, investors, rating agencies and regulators has imperiled everyone's financial future. We need to know what went wrong and how to change the practices that led to this calamity.

Bloomberg columnist Mark Gilbert shows how Wall Street's tolerance for extremes made the global credit crunch both foreseeable and inevitable. He offers a blow-by-blow account of what went wrong and what lessons need to be learned from the crisis.

•Gilbert's argument -- that everyone with skin in the money game had a vested interest in pretending that nothing could go awry -- is a well-defended, compelling indictment of the financial community.
•Gilbert is able to make complex financial events easy to understand.
•His outlook is truly global: this financial crisis respects no geographical boundaries, and Gilbert draws on anecdotes and examples from around the world to make his case. (summary from FSB media)

For more information about Complicit, please visit Bloomberg Books.

3 comments:

Juju at Tales of Whimsy.com said...

Love the cover of the top one :)

brizmus said...

the New Brighton Archaeological Society looks adorable!

Jill of The O.W.L. said...

The New Brighton one looks really cute. I'll have to look for it for my students.

 
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